Serving Athboy & Surrounding Areas
087 835 8635

Teresa Coleman Computer TutorWant to get more out of your PC, laptop or mobile phone? Teresa Coleman offers a tutoring service aimed at those who want to develop their computer skills and gain confidence with everyday tasks including email, the internet, Social Media, printing, creating documents, spreadsheets and much more.

One to one and group training options are available.

Course Selection

  • Computer Tutoring
    Learn how to use your Windows PC or laptop more effectively. Manage files, send and receive emails, use the internet, create documents and print them.
  • Social Media for Beginners
    Get started on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, LinkedIn and other Social Media platforms. What are they? How do you use them? What about safety and privacy?
  • Microsoft Excel for Beginners / Improvers
    Learn how to create and manage spreadsheets. Includes formulae, functions, charts and printing.
  • Microsoft Excel Consultancy
    Helping you to get the most from Excel in your business. Learn how to use Excel to solve specific problems for project work, data management, cleansing, import and export.
  • Tutoring on specific Excel topics
    Learn how to create formulae, charts, pivot tables, VLOOKUPs or any other advanced topics in Microsoft Excel.

Contact Teresa

For further information about the courses available or to enquire about your specific needs, please call 087 835 8635.

Find Teresa Coleman Computer Tutor on Facebook

So what does the CTRL key do?

By itself, it does nothing, just like the SHIFT key (try it out).
However, when you press the CTRL key at the same time as another key a "special function" may be performed by the program running in the window that is active when the keys are pressed.
Sound complicated? Not really - read on please....

The CTRL key (pronounced "control") was added to computer keyboards to provide an extra set of key combinations for programmers use as keyboard shortcuts in their programs. It meant that they could write code to allow users to do things like saving and printing by pressing a keyboard shortcut. (This was back in the days before the mouse was invented).

Over the years standard key combinations developed for the things that many programs do. For example, CTRL + c means "copy the selected text" in many programs and CTRL + n means create a new "thing" in many others.

However, there are no real rules about what key combinations have to be used for - in many programs including Microsoft Word and Excel CTRL+p means "print the current thing", but in others such as WhatsApp for Windows it means "edit my profile". The person who writes the program decides which key combinations make sense for the program they are writing. If the programmer does not include code to handle a specific key combination that key combination will just be ignored.

Try using CTRL + n in a few different programs:
1. Open a mail program such as Outlook or Mail, login to your account and then press the CTRL key and the n key at the same time. A new blank email should be created. Press CTRL + n again to create another new blank email.
2. Open a spreadsheet program such as Microsoft Excel and then press CTRL + n. A new blank spreadsheet should open. Press CTRL + n again to create another one.
3. Open a browser such as Firefox or Internet Explorer and then press CTRL + n. A new browser window should open.

So the CTRL key does nothing by itself. It is an extra key that can be used to create keyboard shortcuts in programs.

There are usually two CTRL keys on a keyboard - one on the bottom left and one on the bottom right - somewhere below the SHIFT keys. Like the SHIFT keys on a typewriter, there are two so that the CTRL key can be accessed easily with both hands. This is to help speed up typing 🙂
... See MoreSee Less

So what does the CTRL key do?
 
By itself, it does nothing, just like the SHIFT key (try it out).
However, when you press the CTRL key at the same time as another key a special function may be performed by the program running in the window that is active when the keys are pressed.
Sound complicated? Not really - read on please....
 
The CTRL key (pronounced control) was added to computer keyboards to provide an extra set of key combinations for programmers use as keyboard shortcuts in their programs. It meant that they could write code to allow users to do things like saving and printing by pressing a keyboard shortcut. (This was back in the days before the mouse was invented).

Over the years standard key combinations developed for the things that many programs do.  For example, CTRL + c means copy the selected text in many programs and CTRL + n means create a new thing in many others.  
 
However, there are no real rules about what key combinations have to be used for - in many programs including Microsoft Word and Excel CTRL+p means print the current thing, but in others such as WhatsApp for Windows it means edit my profile.  The person who writes the program decides which key combinations make sense for the program they are writing. If the programmer does not include code to handle a specific key combination that key combination will just be ignored.  

Try using CTRL + n in a few different programs:
1. Open a mail program such as Outlook or Mail, login to your account and then press the CTRL key and the n key at the same time.  A new blank email should be created. Press CTRL + n again to create another new blank email.
2. Open a spreadsheet program such as Microsoft Excel and then press CTRL + n. A new blank spreadsheet should open. Press CTRL + n again to create another one.
3. Open a browser such as Firefox or Internet Explorer and then press CTRL + n. A new browser window should open.

So the CTRL key does nothing by itself. It is an extra key that can be used to create keyboard shortcuts in programs.
  
There are usually two CTRL keys on a keyboard - one on the bottom left and one on the bottom right - somewhere below the SHIFT keys. Like the SHIFT keys on a typewriter, there are two so that the CTRL key can be accessed easily with both hands. This is to help speed up typing :)

What does the ESC key do?

I've been reminded again recently how daunting it can be when you are presented with a computer keyboard for the first time. The keyboard looks like a typewriter keyboard, but there are all sorts of extra keys that you have to use.

So my next few posts will be about some of the strangely labelled keys on a Windows computer keyboard, what they do, and in come cases, how they came to exist.

Today's post is about the ESC key....

The ESC key stops, interrupts or closes the currently active window IF the program running in that window allows it. ESC is short for Escape (or get-me-outta-here).

The ESC key is usually on the top left of a keyboard.

Try it out:
Example 1: Press the CTRL and F keys at the same time in a browser or in Microsoft Word or Excel to open the "Find" window.
Press the ESC key to close the Find window again.

Example 2: Click on the Start button or press the Windows key to show the Program Menu. Press ESC to close it again.

You can also press the ALT and ESC keys at the same time to cycle through all of your open programs in the order in which you started them. Try this too.

In case you are wondering, the ESC key was invented in 1960 by Bob Bemer of IBM. This was back in the days when computers could really only do one thing at time. The ESC key allowed computer programmers to pause (or temporarily escape out of) the running program and give commands to some other piece of the system, such as "pause the printer so that I can load more paper into it".
... See MoreSee Less

What does the ESC key do?

Ive been reminded again recently how daunting it can be when you are presented with a computer keyboard for the first time. The keyboard looks like a typewriter keyboard, but there are all sorts of extra keys that you have to use.

So my next few posts will be about some of the strangely labelled keys on a Windows computer keyboard, what they do, and in come cases, how they came to exist.

Todays post is about the ESC key....

The ESC key stops, interrupts or closes the currently active window IF the program running in that window allows it. ESC is short for Escape (or get-me-outta-here).

The ESC key is usually on the top left of a keyboard.

Try it out:
Example 1: Press the CTRL and F keys at the same time in a browser or in Microsoft Word or Excel to open the Find window.
Press the ESC key to close the Find window again.

Example 2: Click on the Start button or press the Windows key to show the Program Menu.  Press ESC to close it again.

You can also press the ALT and ESC keys at the same time to cycle through all of your open programs in the order in which you started them. Try this too.

In case you are wondering, the ESC key was invented  in 1960 by Bob Bemer of IBM. This was back in the days when computers could really only do one thing at time. The ESC key allowed computer programmers to pause (or temporarily escape out of) the running program and give commands to some other piece of the system, such as pause the printer so that I can load more paper into it.

Excel on Windows Keyboard Shortcut of the Week

CTRL+S to Save a worksheet
... See MoreSee Less