Delvin Vintage Club

Delvin Vintage Club

We are a group of friends who decided to raise money for charity by having Delvin's first ever tractor run in July 2013. 

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7 days ago

Delvin Vintage club

We are looking for volunteers for road stewards on the 18th of March for our Parade if you can help contact Jackie on 0858203483 or David on ‭0858171671‬ Thank you 😊 ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago

Delvin Vintage club

Dysart ........ It was in the 1660s that Nicholas Ogle ( the Ogle's came from Northumberland) garnered about 440 acres in Westmeath . He worked for the revenue in Ireland and bought up the lands from Cromwellian soldiers in Col. Ingoldbys regiment who had received them in lieu of pay.The lands had belonged to an Edmund Nugent and Alderman Nugent of Drogheda . The grandson of that Nicholas , another Nicholas, picked a beautiful spot upon the lands to build Dysart in 1757. It is just south west of Delvin and is absolutely a hidden gem in terms of Irish medium sized country houses. It was designed by George Pentland, perhaps with his brothers aid. It is 2 storey over basement , although because it was built into a slope , the basement is only visible from the sides and rear. It has the classical Palladian features of Doric door case ( Maurice Craig said Dublin style), beneath a Venetian window( with a niche centre), in turn beneath a rather large Diocletian window built into the front pediment. The sides of the house are particularly attractive with 2 storey , 3 bay bow ends , (not unlike nearby Belvedere house). Interestingly a possible perceived lack of windows across the front expanse of the house was contrasted by plenty at the sides. Dysart sits well back from the road, a kilometre I'd say , in some fine parklands. There is some commercial forestry also nowadays which only allows the merest glimpse of this beauty from the road. It's an absolute joy that the house remains in the original family's hands. There were some interesting characters amongst them. Nicholas who built the house had an eldest son Robert ( of Whitehall in Dublin) who appears to have lost a fortune gambling ( family knowledge says in the Hellfire club ). Robert left for London with his young son Nicholas in 1781 but never returned. A neighbour, Thomas Woods of Rosmead took the boy home.A letter written by Robert informed his son he would never see him again. That young Nicholas married very early (17 or 18) but the marriage was annulled. It seems he lived life to the full and was a member of the " Beggars Benison Hunt" which met at Castlepollard. It is apparently the only hunt ever to lose a full pack of dogs, drowned in a lake while in pursuit . When he died he left his Whitehall estate to a niece, Elizabeth Vyse, but that resulted in a man being shot dead in the house in a row between the Vyses and a brother of Nicholas. The Ogles, whilst never owning huge lands ( in 1876 there were only 186 acres with the house), showed financial acumen in retaining their estate. They also rented land from others too. Obviously marrying well must have helped as well. They were related by marriage to the Pakenhams of Tullynally, the Lambarts of Beauparc and the Coddingtons of Oldbridge among others. Among the Ogle men , Robert, Nicholas and Henry seem to have been constant names and today Robert lives there with Anne his wife , and their son Henry.I'd like to thank them for their kind hospitality and permission to view and record their beautiful home . ... See MoreSee Less

 

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Kate Egan, Ann Egan, Patsy Egan Adams, Nuala Kelly Another very interesting read.